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Brad DeLong on Debt and the Global Economy

An Interview with the Berkeley Macroeconomist
December 20, 2012
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In This Video
Brad DeLong

At a Glance

Born in Boston, Massachusetts

Year Born: 1960

Education

1987, Doctoral degree in economics, Harvard University

1982, Bachelor of arts degree in social studies, summa cum laude, Harvard University

Career Highlights

1997–present, professor, department of economics, University of California at Berkeley

1993–1997, associate professor, department of economics, University of California at Berkeley

1993–1995, deputy assistant secretary for economic policy, U. S. Department of the Treasury

1991–1993, associate professor, department of economics, Harvard University

1988–1991, assistant professor, department of economics, Harvard University

1987–1988, assistant professor, department of economics, Boston University

Outside Activities

Visiting scholar, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

Research associate, National Bureau of Economic Research

Coeditor, The Economists’ Voice

Blogger, Grasping Reality with Both Invisible Hands

 

Brad DeLong is a leading American macroeconomist who combines stellar academic credentials with policymaking experience at the highest levels of government and a gift for making complex economic dynamics intelligible for a general audience. DeLong is a professor of economics at the University of California at Berkeley, where he also serves as chair of the political economy major. He served as deputy assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of the Treasury in the Clinton administration under Lawrence Summers. In addition to being a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, he is an active blogger. His personal blog, Grasping Reality with Both Invisible Hands, covers political and economic issues as well as criticism of their coverage in the media.

In an interview with BCG senior partner and managing director Daniel Stelter, DeLong explains how today’s macroeconomic environment is fundamentally different from the one business executives experienced in the previous 30 years, why the U.S. government should pursue a Keynesian economic policy despite relatively high deficits, and why the European debt crisis won’t be resolved any time soon.