Getting Inside Your Competitors Decision Cycle

Getting Inside Your Competitors Decision Cycle

          

Getting Inside Your Competitors Decision Cycle

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    Strategy is about beating your competition.

    It is not for the faint-hearted.

    It is about choosing a goal and pursuing it relentlessly.

    It is about discipline, insight, and intelligence.

    It is about applying analytical skill—first to derive the right answer and then to drill it into the organization.

    It is about getting inside your competitor’s decision cycle.

    It is all about choice.

    Many companies don’t have the guts to take the “naked mirror” test: What are my strengths and weaknesses? Where am I a winner? Why? What are the patterns in my interactions with competitors? How does my organization learn? Is my company absorbing the lessons that will give it power, mobility, speed, and the ability to anticipate the competition’s next move?

    Any number of companies can sustain high performance for two or three years. Not many can sustain it for a decade. In analyzing the performance of hundreds of companies, we’ve found only a handful that beat the averages year after year.

    Champions outperform their competitors again and again. Poor performers tolerate mediocre results, weak execution, and inconsistent investment. They respond rather than initiate, and approach problems by saying “I think” and “I wish” rather than “I know” and “I can.” High performers deliver. They are extraordinarily consistent, and they are strong at recruiting, training, coaching, and setting high standards.

    They base their business reviews on facts. They inspire fear in their opponents, and their success gives them an appetite for more success.

    When high performers are at the top of their game, they stick it to their opponents. When they achieve momentum, they maintain it. As in chess, they earn a checkmate by controlling the center of the board at the beginning of the game. As in soccer, they score results from their setups. As in golf, they practice, visualize the shot, execute it, and then take the repeatable stroke to the next hole.

    Most companies have elaborate planning exercises. They often delegate the big decisions, and the decisions get dumbed down along the way. Fear freezes teams just as they are about to make their big moves. Calamity rules. People spend time fighting fires instead of creating value. Insights are lost. Data meant purely and impartially to support the emerging battle plan get massaged.

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